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What are the differences between types of tungsten electrodes?

15 July, 19 4:59 pm · Leave a comment · wpdude
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To begin with, they have different colored bands that are used to identify them.  However, there are several other important differences to consider when selecting a tungsten.  Here some of the various types with the respective characteristics:

EWTh-2:  2% thoriated tungsten.  EWTh-2 is color-coded with a red band.  It is known for its durability, ability to withstand high currents, and excellent arc starts.  It is primarily welded using a negative polarity and direct current. It does not have great characteristics when welding with AC.

EWLa-2: 2% lanthanated tungsten.  EWLa-2 is color-coded with a blue band.  It is known for its excellent arc starting ability, excellent current carrying ability, and can withstand many arc cycles.  It can be welded as the negative electrode using direct current or with alternating current.EWP:  Pure tungsten electrode.  EWP is color-coded with a green band.  It has excellent arc stability. It is almost exclusively used with alternating current.  Tungsten emission is more likely with a pure tungsten electrode when compared with other alloyed tungsten electrodes.

EWCe-2:  2% ceriated tungsten.  EWCe-2 is currently color-coded with a gray band, although in the past it was color-coded with an orange band.  It is quite similar to EWLa-2 in that it has excellent current carrying ability, excellent arc starting ability, and can last through many different arc start and arc termination cycles.

Preventing Wire Feed Issues in MIG and Flux-Cored Welding

15 July, 19 4:51 pm · Leave a comment · wpdude
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How do I prevent wire feeding issues when using the MIG welding (GMAW) or flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) process?

Wire feeding issues can be caused by a variety of circumstances.  Some of the most common reasons for wire feeding issues include:

  • Drive roll tension:  The drive rolls that push or pull the wire through the system have a tension that is either too great or too little.  Adjust the spring pressure until tension is appropriate.
  • Drive roll size: The drive rolls may be the wrong size.  For instance, if 1.3 mm drive rolls are being used to move 0.9 mm wire, slipping will most likely occur.
  • Drive roll type:  Some wire require specific kinds of grooves for optimal feeding.  Flux-cored and metal-cored arc welding wires typically require V-groove drive rolls that are knurled.  Aluminum wires require a smooth U-shaped groove.
  • Drive roll condition:  Worn drive rolls will be ineffective at moving wire through the system.
  • Liner size:  If a liner is too small for the wire it will not feed.  If the liner is too big, the wire may have too much freedom to twist inside of it, causing an unpredictable feed.
  • Liner type:  For most wires, steel liners work excellent.  However, some wires, such as aluminum, require a nylon liner to help ensure proper feeding.
  • Liner condition:  A worn liner will be detrimental to wire feeding.  Replace the liner if it is worn or damaged.
  • Contact tip size:  A proper contact tip size should be used.  If the tip is too small, the wire will not feed; if the tip is too large, wire feeding and electrical conductivity may be negatively affected.
  • Wire condition:  Not all wire manufacturers put out the same quality product.  Some wires may have thin and thick spots as well as lubricants that can cause poor wire feeding.

Why use pulsed MIG?

15 July, 19 4:39 pm · Leave a comment · wpdude
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When MIG welding was first invented, it used a constant voltage source of electricity for the arc.  While this method is still used today, the invention of pulsed MIG welding has allowed welders to realize several advantages over conventional MIG welding, several are listed below:

  • Pulsed MIG can be used to weld thin materials.  Conventional MIG welding runs at a constant amperage whereas pulsed MIG welding runs a peak and background amperage.  The constant switching between these two amperages enables pulsed MIG welding to put out a lower overall heat input into the material.  This helps prevent blowouts on thin materials.
  • Pulsed MIG has less spatter than conventional MIG welding.  Pulsed MIG welding uses a peak electrical currents to cleanly burn the wire off at a high amperage.  Pulsed MIG welding also employs a lower background welding amperage immediately after the peak electrical current to prevent the interaction of the electrical arc and the wire from becoming unstable.  This ultimately results in a reduced amount of spatter.
  • Pulsed MIG welding is excellent for out of position welding.  At the same voltage and wire feed settings, conventional MIG tends to have a weld puddle that is larger and more fluid than that of pulsed MIG.  Pulsed MIG has more controllable puddle that prevents it from falling out when gravity is a concern during out of position welding. Furthermore, the reduced amount of spatter than can be achieved with pulsed MIG makes it safer for the welder to perform the out of position operation.

New Rental Product: Welding Fume Extractor Torches

10 June, 19 6:53 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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Fume Extractor Welding TorchWe are pleased to announce that we have added Abicor-Binzel Fume Extractor MIG Torches to our equipment rental fleet.

These portable, compact and powerful high-vacuum extraction units FES-200 & FES-200 W3 capture welding fumes directly at the source, protecting both the welder and the environment from harmful particles.

The machines come with an auto start-stop function so that the fume extractor is activated only when welding is in progress. Welding becomes safer, energy consumption is reduced and unecessary noise levels are eliminated.

You can rent these fume extractor welding torches from red-d-arc.uk

Comparing Welding Equipment Rentals

24 May, 19 11:48 am · Leave a comment · wpdude
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Are you looking for the best rates on portable welder rentals? We can fulfill your welding equipment needs. At Red-d-Arc, we offer you a wide variety of welding equipment for almost every purpose. We provide customized recommendations on each piece of equipment that we rent out.

Get in touch with us today to learn more about our welding equipment rental and long term welder leasing programs. We make it our goal to offer you state-of-the-art welding tools at the most competitive rental rates.

 

contact us

 

The Best in Welding Equipment Rentals

 

Mig Welder HireKemppi MIG welder for hire

If you are looking for a great deal on a mig welder rental, check out our selection. Metal inert gas (MIG) welder models are great for welding indoors or in enclosed spaces. These machines use flux core wire that makes them the perfect option when welding tears or breaks on farm equipment.

However, MIG welders have plenty of other uses that make them perfect for a wide variety of other types of equipment. Keep in mind, however, that you do need a particular set of controlled conditions in order to obtain the best possible results.

We carry a variety of models, including the following:

(more…)

Multi-Process Welders

27 February, 19 10:03 am · Leave a comment · wpdude
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Most people who have been in a technical profession know the constant need for a variety of tools.  One minute you may need a pliers, then a knife, then a file, then a screwdriver, and once the day is all done, a bottle opener.  This is the reason why multi-tools have become so popular; they combine all of these tools into one. In the world of welding, there is something similar to a multi-tool.  It is known as a multi-process welder. Red-D-Arc carries multi-process welders because we know that one minute you might be self-shielded flux core welding some dirty, ½” thick steel and then the next minute be fitting up 18 gauge aluminum that you need to gas tungsten arc weld.

Red-D-Arc provides a wide variety of multi-process power sources to suit many customer needs.  The Miller XMT is a type of multi-process welder that Red-D-Arc carries.  All XMT variations provide the capability to MIG, TIG, flux core, and stick weld.  The Field Pro series also possesses Miller’s proprietary pulse waveform known as Regulated Metal Deposition (RMD).

This is a pulsed short arc MIG welding process that is excellent at bridging wide gaps that can result from poor fit-up.

Red-D-Arc is aware that multi-process welders aren’t always operated in ideal conditions.  Extreme heat and environments with high amounts of dust can destroy welding power sources. That is why Red-D-Arc provides the EX360.  The “EX” is for extreme, because this power source can handle extreme conditions.  If protection from dust and heat are a concern while using multiple welding processes, the EX360 may be your solution.  The EX360, as well as several other multi-process welders offered by Red-D-Arc, are available in four-pack and six-pack configurations to enable increased productivity.

Submerged arc welding is an excellent process to achieve high deposition rates, and Red-D-Arc has them. However, some applications require additional welding processes besides just submerged arc welding. When this is the case, Red-D-Arc also has multi-process submerged arc welding machines.  The DC1000, for instance, provides end users with the ability to not only submerged arc weld, but also provides stick, MIG, and flux cored arc welding capabilities.

For additional information on Red-D-Arc’s multi-process welding product offerings, visit our multi-process welder page.

Welding Stainless Steel – Hints and Guidelines

15 January, 19 2:48 pm · Leave a comment · wpdude
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Welding of Stainless Steel

Stainless steel contains a minimum of 10.5% chromium which imparts it corrosion resistance by forming an oxide layer on the surface. The most common stainless steel is the austenitic type (300 series) which contains chromium and nickel as alloying elements. Other types include ferritic, martensitic and duplex stainless steels. Most stainless steels are considered to have good weldability characteristics. Most common processes used for welding stainless steel are TIG (GTAW) and MIG (GMAW). But, stick welding (SMAW) is also utilized.

Differences in Properties:

The properties of stainless steel differ from mild steel, and these differences need consideration when welding as below:

  • Higher coefficient of expansion, 50% more for austenitic – this results in more distortion
  • Lower coefficient of heat transfer – welding requires lower heat input as it is conducted away slowly
  • Lower electrical conductivity – using the correct and consistent stick-out distance is more critical when using MIG/TIG, higher wire speed for the same current is required when MIG welding

Why segregated work area?

Welding of stainless steel is carried out in a work area segregated from carbon steels. Moreover, tools dedicated for use with stainless steel must not be used to work on carbon steels. These tools include brushes, hammers, clamps, grinders etc. The segregation of work area and tools safeguard the contamination from carbon steels, which may cause welding defects and corrosion (rust) on stainless steel. You must also wear gloves when working with stainless steel as this will prevent oil from the hands passed onto the stainless steel.

Preparation is key!

With stainless steel, it is important that the joint surfaces are thoroughly cleaned before welding to remove any dirt, grease, oil etc. The filler wire also needs to be completely clean.

Additionally, the joint design including the joint gap must cater to the higher expansion rate of stainless steels.

Filler Material Selection:

Filler materials used generally are the same as the base metal. Special considerations are required to select a filler material if welding dissimilar stainless steels or stainless steels where no identical filler material exists. Furthermore, filler materials are selected to reduce the risk of intergranular corrosion and hot cracking.

Welding Considerations:

It is essential to protect the weld during welding using a mainly inert gas. Additionally, the weld root needs to be purged using a pure inert gas.

When welding austenitic stainless steels, it is important to restrict the heat input to a level which is just sufficient to ensure a good weld. The interpass temperature is limited to 350 F. Preheating is not carried out on austenitic stainless steels. Very low carbon grades (suffixed with L e.g. 304L, 316L) are used to prevent the formation of chromium carbides in the heat affected zones which causes intergranular corrosion.

Martensitic stainless steels are generally used as wear resistant materials in overlaying applications. To avoid cracking, accurate preheat needs to be applied and a minimum interpass temperature maintained.

Ferritic stainless steels are used mostly in automotive applications. The heat input in these steels during welding needs to be limited, and a maximum interpass temperature of 300 F is recommended. This will ensure that the grain growth in the material is controlled and the strength is maintained.

With duplex stainless steels, the heat input also needs to be restricted.

Cleaning and Passivation:

Stainless steel welds must be cleaned and passivated after completion to ensure corrosion resistance and good appearance. This is performed manually by mechanical (brushing, grinding, blasting), chemical (applying pickling agents and other chemicals) or electrochemical means.

Red-D-Arc has a wide range of equipment suitable for stainless steel welding for rent including the following:

Multi process welders capable of stick, TIG, MIG, submerged arc, air carbon arc cutting, flux core, up to 1500 A

MIG welding units up to 750 A

TIG welding units up to 750 A

Stick welding units – up to 625A

Also 4 and 6 Paks of welders available

Orbital welders – suitable for stainless steel pipe/tube welding

Various brands including Miller, Lincoln, Red-D-Arc

Have a look at our complete range of welding products.

Special Offer – Used Welders

20 March, 18 9:01 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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Used Welding Machines UK

We have a number of reconditioned used welders available for purchase including:

  • TransPulse Synergic TPS 5000 MIG/MAG Package with wirefeeder and cooler
  • Miller Maxstar 200 Autoline – Stick, TIG, Pulsed TIG, Air Carbon Arc Cutting
  • Lorch T-300 TIG Welder – Stick, TIG, Pulsed TIG

Each of these welding machines comes with a 90 day warranty.

View our flyer for details.

Smoke Extractors: Remove Fumes and Add Value

02 March, 18 8:02 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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welder in need of a smoke extractor
By guest blogger David H.

How important is it to remove welding smoke from the work area? Ask a welder, or ask someone who has to work in the vicinity of welders working in enclosed or semi-enclosed areas.

I recall some years ago working on a Navy general cargo ship. The ship was undergoing extensive renovations and the hold had four or five levels. My employer, a small repair yard in San Francisco, unfortunately did not take air quality in the work area seriously. There were more than 20 of us working in the hold, and some number of us were welders. From a distance you could see where the work was being done — smoke and fumes drifting up out of the hold! In those days, safety requirements weren’t always top of mind. OSHA and other regulations aside, taking care of your workers by providing a safe work environment is simply the right thing to do. Without them your business can never be profitable. By failing to provide a safe workplace, you may lose workers due to health issues and employee turnover or face consequences for not complying with standards.

“respirators are hot and uncomfortable, and many welders simply refuse to use them”

There are a number of ways to deal with welding fume issues. One approach is the use of respirators. I often wore one, but they are hot and uncomfortable, and many welders simply refuse to use them. They can be remarkably expensive, over the long haul,  given that filters must be replaced daily.  If the mask is a disposable type, the entire mask must be replaced daily.

Portable smoke extractors – sometimes referred to as smoke eaters – are a far better solution. They extract a higher percentage of the fumes than respirator masks and protect everyone in the work area, not just the welders. They can be moved around the job site and from one job site to another, but can also be set up at permanent work stations.  These machines can help make sure that your work space is a place where people can get their work done safely. Your employees will thank you.

To view the smoke extractors Red-D-Arc offers for rent head over to our smoke extractor rental page.

Fast, Efficient Flux-Cored Welding with Semi-Automatic Wirefeeders

29 January, 18 8:23 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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flux cored welding with semi automatic wirefeeder
By guest blogger David H.

Some years back I was working in a shipyard in San Francisco. The yard had several small repair jobs going, plus a fairly large project building six ocean-going barges. The supervisor who was in charge of the barge-building project was looking for volunteers to operate semi-automatic wire feeders, using flux-cored wire, to weld stiffeners to the skin of the barges. I had never used a wire feeder before, so I volunteered out of curiosity.

After a very short training period, possibly all of 30 minutes but I think a bit less, I was off and running. I was impressed by the quality of the welds and the speed at which they were deposited. Without question I was outpacing anything that could be done by stick welding, and I felt it was easier to maintain a uniform weld size too. The machine itself was light enough and small enough to move without difficulty, and the spools of wire lasted long and were quick and easy to replace when the spool of welding wire was finished.

Red-D-Arc has nearly a dozen semi-automatic wire feeders available for almost any application. We also carry fully automatic wire feeders, which are faster still and appropriate in certain circumstances – like building storage tanks –  especially for large-deposition welds.

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